Bolinas Lagoon Restoration

Caring for a Wetland of International Importance

UPDATED: SEPTEMBER 29, 2020

Since the early 19th century, land use changes have altered the historic shoreline and watershed of Bolinas Lagoon. Increased sediment delivery has resulted in a loss of tidal prism and changes in native habitat. Bolinas Lagoon contains over 1,100 acres of marsh, mudflats, and subtidal and intertidal lagoon habitat that supports a variety of special status plant and animal species. 

Bolinas Lagoon's ecological significance and complexity require careful planning. Restoration activities are long-term and multi-faceted, including ongoing invasive species management, rock slope protection, and bathymetry. The restoration of Bolinas Lagoon builds upon decades of grassroots community efforts. 

At the North End of the Lagoon, progress is being made on the Bolinas Wye Wetlands project. This work is the result of over 20 years of collaboration between the communities of Bolinas and Stinson Beach and the Marin County Open Space District (MCOSD), Point Reyes National Seashore, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary.

Resource Management

MCOSD has primary responsibility the lagoon's resources, but management and restoration of the lagoon is shared with these other agencies, which have jurisdiction over the lagoon and its watershed:

The Bolinas Lagoon Advisory Council advises on the management and ecological restoration of Bolinas Lagoon. The council includes representation from:

  • Marin County Parks
  • Golden Gate National Recreation Area
  • Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary
  • Point Reyes National Seashore
  • Audubon Canyon Ranch
  • Bolinas Rod & Boat Club
  • College of Marin
  • Point Blue
  • Seadrift Homeowners Association
  • Community members appointed by the Board of Supervisors